Pick of the Day: Live & Let Die

Can’t say I was ever a big James Bond fan. In fact, I think I’ve only seen two of the God knows how many movies starring God knows how many different James Bonds that have been made over the decades in actual theatres. Even on TV, I can’t honestly say that I’ve watched James Bond very much.

The first Bond flick I saw was Diamonds Are Forever (1971). I think Sean Connery was Bond then, and Jill St. John (pictured) was in it. It was okay, I guess. I was on the cusp of puberty,  Jill St. John spent a lot of time parading in a bikini. There were some gun-fights and explosions, plenty of neat gadgets and hot cars, what’s not to like?

The other Bond movie I remember seeing in the theatre was Live and Let Die (1973). That was Roger Moore’s debut in the role. Jane Seymour was the lead babe in that one, and it had a heavy voodoo theme with a lot of the action set in the Carribean.

In Diamonds Are Forever, the theme song was done by Shirley Bassey. In Live and Let Die Paul McCartney did the honours. Of the two movies, I remember being more impressed by Live and Let Die. It was darker, more suspenseful. McCartney’s tune was good too. It was included a couple of years later on his double-live album Wings Over America which I listened to a ton on 8-track.

Tonight’s Paul McCartney tribute performance that the RSO’s presenting at Conexus Arts Centre at 8 p.m. takes its name from the Bond theme song MCartney wrote. With symphonic backing, Tony Kishman and several other musicians will perform.

To get you in the mood, here’s video of the mid-90s cover Guns ‘n’ Roses did of  Live and Let Die. (YouTube)

Author: Gregory Beatty

Greg Beatty is a crime-fighting shapeshifter who hatched from a mutagenic egg many decades ago. He likes sunny days, puppies and antique shoes. His favourite colour is not visible to your puny human eyes. He refuses to write a bio for this website and if that means Whitworth writes one for him, so be it.