Pick of the Day: Project Nim

Directed by James Marsh, who also did the Oscar Award-winning film Man On Wire about a French daredevil’s illegal high-wire walk at the World Trade Center in 1974, this documentary tackles another controversial event from the 1970s.

Project Nim involves an experiment an American psychology professor, with the assistance of some comely grad students, conducted involving a baby chimpanzee, which they raised in New York, and strove to teach sign language and other human behaviors in an effort to explore the divide between nature and nuture in animal and human behavior.

Project Nim screens at the RPL Theatre tonight at 9 p.m. Here’s the trailer.

P.S. Got word of this event too late to include it in the listings in our Jan. 12 magazine, but tonight and tomorrow night fourth-year arts education students at the University of Regina are hosting a gala fundraiser called And Now For Something Completely Different at Darke Hall. Tickets are $12 advance, $15 at the door, with children under 10 admitted free. Money raised from the performance will go toward a trip the students have planned to San Francisco to attend a conference called Professional Learning As Community Experience. For more information email to Erika.Folnovic@gmail.com

Author: Gregory Beatty

Greg Beatty is a crime-fighting shapeshifter who hatched from a mutagenic egg many decades ago. He likes sunny days, puppies and antique shoes. His favourite colour is not visible to your puny human eyes. He refuses to write a bio for this website and if that means Whitworth writes one for him, so be it.

3 thoughts on “Pick of the Day: Project Nim”

  1. “The movie suggests that humans benefitted little from Project Nim, and Nim himself not at all.”
    — Roger Ebert

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